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Answers: 2006 Series -  January 3, 2006 Lecture 52 of 52  NEXT»

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Photo courtesy of: Patrick Ma, M.D.
Used with permission. Not to be reproduced.

A 72-year-old man with diabetes and hypertension presented to your clinic four months ago with a central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) of the left eye.  He did not keep his follow-up appointments but came in for "new glasses". On exam, you find that the patient has active neovascularization of the iris, no visible neovascularization of the angle, and an intraocular pressure of 18mmHg. 

The next most important step is:   

a -- immediate panretinal photocoagulation (PRP)


Central Retinal Vein Occlusion (CRVO)

  • With active neovascularization of the iris following a CRVO, the most important next step is to treat the patient with a heavy PRP (pan retinal photocoagulation) in an effort to prevent the development of neovascular glaucoma.

 


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