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Answers: 2007 series -  July 24, 2007 Lecture 23 of 52  NEXT»

To see views enlarged, click on the individual pictures...

 

1.  All of the following are evidence of traumatic glaucoma except:   
 

d -- thinned sclera

 

2.  Gonioscopy should be performed on patients with traumatic hyphemas: 
 

c -- 6-8 weeks after the injury

It is very important to perform a complete ocular exam on BOTH eyes in patients with a history of ocular trauma. It is also important to remember that some examinations (for example gonioscopy/scleral depression) should wait at least 6-8 weeks until after a traumatic hyphema has cleared (as performing these examinations and physically manipulating the eye could increase the chance of a rebleed).  When performing a gonioscopy, it is important to compare the angle structures of both eyes and look for such anatomic findings as a widened ciliary body band and torn iris processes.  It is important to both educate patients who have sustained ocular trauma of the symptoms to report, the need for good baseline documentation (for example, visual fields), and the need for long-term follow-up. Additionally, the patient should be educated on the importance of wearing protective eyewear.

The ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) pictured above demonstrates the anatomic changes that occur with angle recession.


 


Lecture 23 of 52 «Previous Lecture   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52    Next»