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2008 Series -  September 30, 2008 Lecture 14 of 53  NEXT»

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This 10-year-old girl presented as shown in the pictures above. Her left eye is both blind and painful. Her family said that the eye had been enlarging for many years, but no prior treatment had been sought. The child appeared otherwise healthy. Careful checking of the intraocular pressure in the left eye resulted in a reading of 65 mmhg. The other eye appeared to be normal with acuity of 20/20.

1. This case most likely represents:

a. end stage unilateral congenital glaucoma with impending perforation
b. the result of long standing nutritional deficiency
c. probably unrecognized trauma
d. the result of unreported traditional medicine
e. none of the above

2. What would you do now?

a. attempt anterior segment repair
b. enucleate the eye
c. eviscerate the eye
d. exenterate the orbit
e. none of the above

3. After treatment what would be your first choice?
a. provide a better diet for the child
b. provide safety glasses after fitting a prosthesis
c. start pilocarpine in the right eye as prophylaxis
d. start systemic antibiotics
e. none of the above

For answers to the above, click here on or after October 7, 2008.

 

 


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