logo
Question of the Week
Video Library
Ophthalmology Books & Manuals
Cybersight Atlas of Eye Diseases
The Ophthalmology Minute
Nursing Education
Eye Care Equipment
Orbis Program Features
Free Online Journals
Ophthalmology Links
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
Print ViewPrint this Page
2008 Series -  December 23, 2008 Lecture 2 of 53  NEXT»

To see views enlarged, click on the individual pictures...

Fig1
Fig. 1
Fig2
Fig. 2
Fig3a
Fig. 3a
Fig3b
Fig. 3b
All photos courtesy of: LV Prasad Eye Institute
Used with permission. Not to be reproduced.

A 4-year-old boy presented with a mass on the right upper lid growing gradually for the past one month [Fig. 1]. Close examination revealed a 10 mm round, cystic, smooth lesion with dry keratinized surface. The lid margin was well spared with prominent feeder vessels on its surface [Fig. 2]. There was no history of trauma or the mass increasing in size on crying. The rest of the ocular examination was normal and the left eye examination was unremarkable.

1. What is the most appropriate clinical diagnosis?

a. capillary hemangioma
b. lymphangioma
c. cavernous hemangioma
d. none of the above

2. B scan [Fig 3 a & b] above is suggestive of:

a. cystic lesion with blood flow
b. solid lesion
c. lesion with medium to high blood flow
d. cystic lesion

3. Treatment would be:
a. observation
b. intra-lesional steroids
c. excision with base cryotherapy
d. a trial of intra-lesional steroids followed by excision biopsy, if no resolution

For answers to the above, click here on or after December 30, 2008.

 

 


Lecture 2 of 53 «Previous Lecture   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53    Next»