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Answers: 2005 Series -  July 5, 2005 Lecture 26 of 52  NEXT»

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A 60-year-old white male presents with a painless, salmon-colored subconjunctival mass in his right eye.  The patient denies trauma and has no significant ocular history.

This most likely represents:    

a -- lymphoma

Virtually all ocular adnexal lymphomas are non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.  They can be seen as flesh-colored or salmon pink patches found in the fornices, as in this patient, occuring in the sixth and seventh decade. Periocular lymphoid tumors occur in 1.5% to 4.0% of systemic lymphomas, and fewer than 1% have ocular involvement as the initial presentation. A biopsy, not too extensive, is required before treatment is undertaken.  This treatment can be radiation, cryotherapy, or chemotherapy with the latter supervised by a general oncologist.

Reference:  Eichler M.D., Fraunfelder F.T.   Lymphoid tumors.  In: Current Ocular Therapy, Fraunfelder F.T., Roy F.H., and Randall J., eds., 2000, W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia, pp 246-47. 


Lecture 26 of 52 «Previous Lecture   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52    Next»