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Answers: 2005 Series -  August 2, 2005 Lecture 22 of 52  NEXT»

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A 45-year-old woman presents with 20/30 vision in both eyes and is noted to have bilateral stromal opacities with clear intervening spaces between the focal opacities.  She denies history of ocular trauma or infection and currently has no visual complaints.  Interestingly, examination of her mother reveals similar corneal findings.

1.  These corneal opacities are most likely due to:   
 

c -- corneal dystrophy

2.  The next step in treating her condition would include: 
 

d -- observation

  • The patient's corneal findings are most consistent with a corneal dystrophy as a family member has similar findings and she denies trauma or infection. Granular dystrophy is autosomal dominant.
  • The deposited material in granular dystrophy is hyaline and histologically is stained with Masson-trichrome.
  • Given her relatively good visual acuity at this point in time, she should be observed.


Lecture 22 of 52 «Previous Lecture   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52    Next»