logo
Question of the Week
Video Library
Ophthalmology Books & Manuals
Cybersight Atlas of Eye Diseases
The Ophthalmology Minute
Nursing Education
Eye Care Equipment
Orbis Program Features
Free Online Journals
Ophthalmology Links
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
Print ViewPrint this Page
Answers: 2005 Series -  November 29, 2005 Lecture 5 of 52  NEXT»

To see views enlarged, click on the individual pictures...


Photo courtesy of: 
Patrick Ma, M.D.
Used with permission. Not to be reproduced.

A 35-year-old woman presents with decreased vision in the left eye (20/80) and is noted to have the above fundus findings. The right eye has normal vision and an unremarkable fundus exam. A fluoroscein angiogram  shows early hyperfluorescence and an ultrasound shows the presence of calcium within the area of question.

The most likely diagnosis is:   

c -- choroidal osteoma


Choroidal Osteoma

  • These are benign bony tumors primarily located in the juxtapapillary choroid and may enlarge slowly over time. 
  • They are frequented associated with choroidal neovascularization and serous detachments of the retina.
  • Sclerochoroidal calcifications can be seen with hyperparathyroidism, chronic renal failure, and vitamin D intoxication.

 


Lecture 5 of 52 «Previous Lecture   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52    Next»