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Answers: 2005 Series -  May 3, 2005 Lecture 35 of 52  NEXT»

 

ptosis procedure

 

This picture shows a common procedure used to treat ptosis.

1.  This procedure is called:   
 

d -- frontalis suspension

This is an apt name for this procedure which does exactly what the name implies.

 

2.  Indications for this procedure include:  
 

a -- ptosis with little or no levator function

This procedure should not be used ordinarily when levator function is present.  In such a case with at least some levator function, a levator resection (or shortening) of some type will provide a more "physiologic" result.


3.  Potential complications from this procedure (from exposure) include:
 

d -- all of the above 

As with any ptosis procedure which changes the relationship of the upper lid and cornea, post operative induced astigmatism can occur.  Because the lid is suspended from the brow without much ability to close the eye, corneal drying can occur.  It is safer to do this procedure in a patient with an intact Bell phenomenon so that when attempts at blinking occur, the eye rolls upward where it may receive some lubrication.  When the patient looks down after having this procedure, the operated lid tends to "hang up" resulting in a widened palpebral fissure.  In a few cases this procedure is done in the fellow, normal eye, to balance the patient's appearance on down gaze.

 


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